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Smart swaps: Dairy

Optimise dairy’s benefits with these simple swaps.

We’re encouraged to enjoy at least two serves of dairy a day. This helps us get important nutrients. Not just protein and calcium but, also, riboflavin, vitamins A, D and B12, phosphorus, zinc and iodine.

But dairy foods can also have added sodium, be higher in saturated fat, and contain lactose (milk sugar), a common cause of milk intolerance. Making smart swaps with our dairy choices means we can make lower saturated fat, lower sodium and, for those who need to, lactose-free choices. We can also get more of the good stuff, such as calcium and probiotics.

Any product examples given here were correct at time of publication. However, remember to check the ingredients and nutrition information every so often, as these can change over time.

Get less saturated fat
Swap Mainland Easy Eating Mild Cheese for Mainland Noble Reduced Fat Cheddar
Lose 50 per cent of the sodium
by swapping Blue River Sheep Milk Vintage Feta (720mg sodium/100g) for Blue River Sheep Milk Tussock Creek Feta (340mg sodium/100g)
Need lactose-free?
Swap your usual trim milk for Anchor Zero Lacto Trim Milk
Get more probiotics
by swapping natural yoghurt for a live yoghurt, such as De Winkel All Natural Plain Unsweetened Acidophilus Yoghurt
Get more calcium
Trade your usual trim milk for a calcium-fortified trim milk, such as Lewis Road Creamery Calcium Enriched Low Fat Milk
Cook with less saturated fat
Swap
Philadelphia Original Cream for Cooking for Philadelphia Light Cream for Cooking
First published: Jan 2019
Last updated: April 12 2019
Last science review: December 13 2018

Article sources and references




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